Not The Grub Street Journal

Exegesis Hermeneutics Flux Capacitor of Truthiness

Priti Patel was sacked from her junior minister post, why, for unofficial liaisons with the MOSSAD in Israel, whilst on “holiday”, in breach of home-office rules.

Priti Patel
Priti Patel cut short a visit to Africa and has been ordered to fly back to London by Theresa May CREDIT: PA

Christopher Hope will be answering reader’s questions in the comments section below this article at 12pm. It’s free and easy to register and take part.

Priti Patel’s future is hanging in the balance after it emerged she held two further unauthorised meetings with senior Israeli politicians without telling Downing Street.

The International Development secretary cut short a visit to Africa and has been ordered to fly back to London by Theresa May, the Prime Minister this morning.

There is growing speculation that she could be sacked this morning after she admitted she met the Israeli public security minister in September in Parliament and a senior official from the Israeli foreign minister in…

To point this out is not antisemitic.

On Anti Semitism, as a student of Maimonides and his Guide for the perplexed to the Torah see this post. . 

For Gnasher Jew and the Zealots of the Tory Party Central Office see these posts.

I am a friend of Israel, I am not though a supporter of Benjamin Netanyahu and Netenjahu Zionism. I am though what might be termed a Soft Zionist. A parallel comparison might be say when back in the 70’s I supported the Anti Apartheid Campaign but did not consider this position to be an argument which could extend to saying that South Africa should cease to Exist, similarly supporting BDS is not in any way logically extended to any argument for the destruction of the State of Israel.

Rabbi Hillel famously said when asked to sum up the Torah in a sentence.

On the “Golden Rule”

Once there was a gentile who came before Shammai, and said to him: “Convert me on the condition that you teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot. Shammai pushed him aside with the measuring stick he was holding. The same fellow came before Hillel, and Hillel converted him, saying: That which is despicable to you, do not do to your fellow, this is the whole Torah, and the rest is commentary, go and learn it.”  – Babylonian TalmudShabbat 31a

If Not Now, When?

“If I am not for myself, then who will be for me? And if I am only for myself, then what am I? And if not now, when?”

On Time for Study

“Do not say: ‘When I have leisure I shall study,’ perhaps you will never have leisure.”

Ten Yiddish Expressions You Should Know

By Michael

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For a language originally spoken only by Eastern European Jews, Yiddish has certainly found its way into common English. My wife was raised in a farming region in the American Midwest and never knew any Jewish people as a child, so she was surprised when I informed her that she uses Yiddish words all the time. Most Yiddish words comes from German, as well as Hebrew and the Slavic languages, but they’ve entered the popular English language through the entertainment industry and East Coast American society. I like the sound of Yiddish words that begin with the letter S, especially sh, and here are some of my favourites.

1. shlep
To drag, traditionally something you don’t really need; to carry unwillingly. When people “shlep around,” they are dragging themselves, perhaps slouchingly. On vacation, when I’m the one who ends up carrying the heavy suitcase I begged my wife to leave at home, I shlep it.

2. shlemiel
A clumsy, inept person, similar to a klutz (also a Yiddish word). The kind of person who always spills his soup.

3. shlimazel
Someone with constant bad luck. When the shlemiel spills his soup, he probably spills it on the shlimazel. Fans of the TV sitcom “Laverne and Shirley” remember these two words from the Yiddish-American hopscotch chant that opened each show.

4. shmooze
Chat, make small talk, converse about nothing in particular. But at Hollywood parties, guests often schmooze with people they want to impress.

5. shmaltzy
Excessively sentimental, gushing, flattering, over-the-top, corny. This word describes some of Hollywood’s most famous films. From shmaltz, which means chicken fat or grease.

6. schlock
Cheap, shoddy, or inferior, as in, “I don’t know why I bought this schlocky souvenir.”

7. spiel
A long, involved sales pitch, as in, “I had to listen to his whole spiel before I found out what he really wanted.” From the German word for play.

8. schmuck
Often used as an insulting word for a self-made fool, but you shouldn’t use it in polite company at all, since it refers to male anatomy.

9. shalom
It means “deep peace,” and isn’t that a more meaningful greeting than “Hi, how are ya?”

10. shtik
Something you’re known for doing, an entertainer’s routine, an actor’s bit, stage business; a gimmick often done to draw attention to yourself.

Update: We published a new post with 40 Yiddish words that you should check out!

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